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Diane Clark: Screen-Free, Active, Fun Learning That Uses Technology

Diane Clark: Screen-Free, Active, Fun Learning That Uses Technology
Diane: Thanks for having me, Spiffy! Did you notice how during the pandemic nearly everything we usually did transferred over to a screen? Even school? For most of us we were using a screen for work, school, entertainment, and staying in touch with our friends and family that we couldn't see during those difficult times. But, whilst we all appreciate screens, it's also really good to get off them when we can and be as active as possible! We thought that it would be a great idea to create something fun and active that helps our learning but also has technology involved. That's when we thought of Rock Stepper. The technology allows us to connect with and compete with our friends, measure our movement and progress, but without the heavy reliance on a screen!

Michelle Ross: Connecting Kids and Their Families Safely and Affordably

Michelle Ross: Connecting Kids and Their Families Safely and Affordably
Michelle: Glad to be with you, Spiffy! Big technology companies make the most money when people use their devices all the time. Tech is amazing, but we’re also learning that constant technology use can be harmful or addictive—especially for kids. At my company, COSMO, we’re building tech products that connect kids to their families in thoughtful, age-appropriate ways. We’re building an operating system that will support a whole list of family technology devices, starting with a safe 4G smartwatch made just for kids!

Françoise Mouly: Pioneering the Use of Comics for Classroom Literacy

Françoise Mouly: Pioneering the Use of Comics for Classroom Literacy
Françoise: Thanks for having me, Spiffy! Long before I founded TOON, I worked on RAW magazine, a graphics magazine that declared “comics aren’t just for kids anymore!”, and while it definitely helped bring comics into universities, museums, bookstores and libraries for adults, I felt kids got left behind in that process. I founded RAW Junior in 1998, to make the kinds of books—and comics—that I wanted to read with my young children.